Data of multiple studies from the Many Labs project (Klein et al., 2014) replicating Lorge & Curtiss (1936).

quote_source

Format

A data frame with 6343 rows and 15 columns:

ID

participant number

source

attributed source of the quote: Washington or Bin Laden

response

evaluation of the quote on a 9-point Likert scale, with 1 indicating disagreement and 9 indicating agreement

age

participant's age

sex

participant's sex

citizenship

participant's citizenship

race

participant's race

major

participant's major

native_language

participant's native language

referrer

location of where the study was conducted

compensation

how the participant was compensated for their participation

recruitment

how the participant was recruited

separation

description of how the study was administered in terms of participant isolation

us_or_international

whether the study was conducted in the US or outside of the US (international)

lab_or_online

whether the study was conducted in the lab or online

Details

Lorge and Curtiss (1936) examined how a quotation is perceived when it is attributed to a liked or disliked individual. The quotation of interest was: "I hold it that a little rebellion, now and then, is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms are in the physical world." In one condition the quotation was attributed to Thomas Jefferson, a liked individual, and in the other condition it was attributed to Vladimir Lenin, a disliked individual. More agreement was observed when the quotation was attributed to Jefferson than Lenin. In the replication studies, the quotation was: "I have sworn to only live free, even if I find bitter the taste of death." This quotation was attributed to either George Washington, the liked individual, or Osama Bin Laden, the disliked individual.

References

Lorge, I., & Curtiss, C. C. (1936). Prestige, suggestion, and attitudes. The Journal of Social Psychology, 7, 386-402. https://doi.org/10.1080/00224545.1936.9919891

Klein, R.A. et al. (2014) Investigating Variation in Replicability: A "Many Labs" Replication Project. Social Psychology, 45(3), 142-152. https://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1864-9335/a000178